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Barrett's Forums This discussion is devoted to the latest advances in neuroscience and the clinical phenomena it explains.

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Old 25-05-2011, 02:46 AM   #1
Karen L
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Default Simple Contact Video

Here is seven minutes of video made in Vancouver on the first Day. Thank you Barrett and Mike Reoch for this demonstration.

I have a fully combined video uploading tonight. I will edit this post as soon as the link is available.

The video clips from Vancouver.

[YT]7PdKFK6NkOs[/YT]

[YT]F8tvipt_-3Y[/YT]

Karen

Last edited by Karen L; 25-05-2011 at 08:59 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 25-05-2011, 03:05 AM   #2
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Thank you Karen. This is something that's been a long time coming.

Mike's the focus here, and I've seen this sort of movement, relaxation and rise in blood flow to the surface many thousands of times. It doesn't surprise me anymore, but others will probably see it otherwise.

Comments welcomed.
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Old 25-05-2011, 05:37 AM   #3
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Looking forward to the course
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Old 25-05-2011, 05:50 AM   #4
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Here is the video spliced and titled of Barrett's demonstration of Simple Contact. It is just over 7 minutes and is 543mb. If you have a youtube program downloader you can save a copy for your self. Bernard might be able to arrange a permanent file for SomaSimple in the future. I can't make the [YT] feature work so for now click thru on the above link. Note to self: YouTube URL letters only wrapped.Thanks.

Karen

[YT]5tfyi-bFcJc[/YT]

Last edited by Karen L; 25-05-2011 at 08:07 AM. Reason: fix youtube
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Old 25-05-2011, 05:56 AM   #5
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Interesting.
It's a very cool experience to stop inhibiting one's own brain, get out of its way, just let it respond in the moment to whatever is going on around.

One thing I find awkward about teaching is the divided attention. So used to just focusing, 100% on whatever I'm doing. In teaching, one has to remain aware of the "crowd" (however tiny it may be), so the demo of the treatment is often not what really goes on in actual treatment. Maybe that was not actually the case in this video. Does divided attention actually matter? For me, it does. So, as an inexperienced teacher and mostly a non-verbal treater, I find talking while treating or at least while demoing a treatment to a group an uphill skill set.
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Old 25-05-2011, 06:41 AM   #6
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I think Barrett's post Here explains how a therapist engages on multiple levels. Words deform the auditory sensory apparatus, transform context and reduce threat just as the tactile sensory apparatus does.

One of the few instances where we can multitask.

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Old 25-05-2011, 06:44 AM   #7
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Talking and demonstrating is definitely a skill set but I think Barrett has the knack of doing both. Probably something to do with juggling skills.

I would be interested if any class member has tried SC on him/herself. This is a handy skill, avoiding the use of OTC analgesics, unless it is a humdinger of a headache for instance.

I liked the video. Next best thing to being there in person.

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Old 25-05-2011, 11:45 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Karen L View Post
Bernard might be able to arrange a permanent file for SomaSimple in the future.
I just downloaded it and I'll put a copy on our channel and on the site.
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Old 25-05-2011, 12:53 PM   #9
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Great!
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Old 25-05-2011, 01:21 PM   #10
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Karen - that is fantastic.
Barrett, I am happy to see that there is a good video "out there" now. Thanks for that.
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Old 25-05-2011, 02:34 PM   #11
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Thanks Karen,

I liked it. I have to admit I really wanted to see what it's like although I pretty much knew already.
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Old 25-05-2011, 10:00 PM   #12
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It is very helpful to see this in action. Not was I was imaging. Very interesting.

Barrett, you mention Mike moving his arm. From this camera angle we couldn't see his left arm. Was this something visible or something you could feel?

Thanks so much.
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Old 26-05-2011, 12:17 AM   #13
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Sasha,

I think you mean his right arm.

This could be both seen and felt. I swear that this isn't hard to do.

Do you know why there's no touching allowed in poker? Because it would reveal too much.

Talk to you very soon.
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Old 26-05-2011, 02:50 AM   #14
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You are right I did mean the right arm
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Old 26-05-2011, 04:06 AM   #15
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This is great. Thanks for the video.
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Old 27-05-2011, 02:46 PM   #16
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Mike seems miles away in his own dreamy little world. Do patients get sleepy or a bit "out of it" as they relax with simple contact? Also, Barrett, any plans on coming to Europe? Please?
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Old 28-05-2011, 05:09 AM   #17
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Barrett,
I appreciate you/Karen posting the videos of ideomotion. I do have to admit I am a bit skeptical and am curious about the "effortless" motion of the patient. How do you truly inhibit ones brain? Does the patient have to be a 100% believer in the technique for it work? I feel that any percentage of skepticism would force them to resist complete relaxation. I state this due to you stating "whenever a movement unhesitatingly and immediately follows upon the idea of it, we have ideomotor action". I have read your 2003 piece in the Journal of Osteo Medicine on the analgesia of movement, and despite you saying it has been well documented, I have been unable to find much literature on it outside of this website (I did read the McCarthy piece for chronic neck pain which demonstrates promise)...

I also have questions on the effects of this technique being characterized by softening of the muscles and warmth. Who is perceiving this and what research has been done to conclude this is what is occurring?

You guys have a vast array of literature reference and if you could just point me into the direction of some good readings (I have access to tons of journals--just need references) I would be happy to read more and continue to mold my beliefs.
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Old 28-05-2011, 06:15 AM   #18
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Hi Joe,

Diane said:
Quote:
Interesting.
It's a very cool experience to stop inhibiting one's own brain, get out of its way, just let it respond in the moment to whatever is going on around.
I am wondering if you mistook Diane's comment. As the person experiencing/receiving handling (SC), the inhibition she alludes to is auto-suppression of movement i.e., sitting still for long periods in an office, classroom or other culturally repressive environment. People these days are quite conditioned to suppress their needs or desires to move. Not the therapist or patient inhibiting their brain but allowing its instinctive expression. You can and do engage in ideomotor activity yourself, you don't need a facilitator. Reaching for your coffee, swatting a fly, running your fingers through your hair, shifting in your chair.

The person experiencing Simple Contact reports the warming and softening. I would really like to see one day Neuroscience Research Australia (Lorimer Moseley's group) take on research on ideomotion. I think the warming and softening could be measured much in the way the rubber hand experiment was conducted.

Quote:
This is something I have seen before from massage-research.com Fascial Unwinding: Ideomotor Action (7) Unwinding as an ideomotor action
Quote:
The use of ideomotor therapy in the treatment of chronic neck pain: A single systems research design Mason, J. (2009). The use of ideomotor therapy in the treatment of chronic neck pain: A single systems research design. Unpublished thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the degree of Master of Osteopathy, Unitec Institute of Technology, New Zealand.
Quote:
Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci. 2010 Dec;10(4):454-9.
Planning not to do something: Does intending not to do something activate associated sensory consequences?
Kühn S, Brass M.
Source
Ghent University, Belgium. simone.kuhn@ugent.be

Abstract

The present fMRI study investigated the central assumptions of ideomotor theory that actions become associated with their sensory consequences. Furthermore, we tested whether sensory effects can also become associated with the voluntary omission of an action. In a training phase, participants had to decide between executing an action and not executing it. Both decisions were followed by a specific effect tone. In the test phase, the participants had to carry out actions without hearing the effect tone. They either had to decide whether to execute an action or not or were instructed to execute an action or not. Our results reveal an increased activity in the auditory cortex elicited by responses that formerly elicited a tone-namely, self-chosen actions and self-chosen nonactions. Moreover, we found binding effects for stimulus-cued actions, but not for stimulus-cued nonactions. These findings support ideomotor theory by showing that a link exists between actions and their effects. Furthermore, our data demonstrate on a neural level that effect tones can become associated with intentionally not acting, therewith supporting the idea of a binding between the voluntary omission of an action and its effects in the environment.
Quote:
Am J Physiol. 1999 Jul;277(1 Pt 2):H261-7.Even slight movements disturb analysis of cardiovascular dynamics.
Fortrat JO, Formet C, Frutoso J, Gharib C.
Source Laboratoire de Physiologie de l'Environnement, Faculté de Médecine Lyon Grange-Blanche, 69373 Lyon Cedex 08, France.
Abstract
We hypothesized that spontaneous movements (postural adjustments and ideomotion) disturb analysis of heart rate and blood pressure variability and could explain the discrepancy between studies. We measured R-R intervals and systolic blood pressure in nine healthy sitting subjects during three protocols: 1) no movement allowed, 2) movements allowed but not standing, 3) movements and standing allowed. Heart rate and blood pressure were not altered by movements. Movements with or without standing produced a twofold or greater increase of the overall variability of R-R intervals and of the low-frequency components of spectral analysis of heart rate variability. The spectral exponent beta of heart rate variability (1. 123 at rest) was changed by movements (1.364), and the percentage of fractal noise (79% at rest) was increased by standing (91%, coarse-graining spectral analysis). Spontaneous movements could induce a plateau in the correlation dimensions of heart rate variability, but they changed its nonlinear predictability. We suggest that future studies on short-term cardiovascular variability should control spontaneous movements.
Pubmed has other papers that might help you more, it is all in how you pose the query.

Karen

Last edited by Karen L; 28-05-2011 at 08:07 AM. Reason: wording
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Old 28-05-2011, 11:09 AM   #19
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Joe,

I really don’t understand your asking “How do you truly inhibit ones brain?” I can’t figure out what you mean.

What I say repeatedly is that behavior is influenced by context, that ectodermal activity is context dependent and that the culture inhibits instinctive expression. Changing context is our job as therapists. When Cory says we are “contextual architects” he articulates something inevitable in our relation to the patient and identifies our responsibility.

Please remember that Simple Contact is a form of communication, not a way to coerce others with a certain manner of handling. The patient tells me what they sense in response to their own ideomotion, I sense it in the same manner anyone with a hand on them or talking to them would. No real skill is involved.

That quote?

"
Quote:
Whenever a movement unhesitatingly and immediately follows upon the idea of it, we have ideomotor action"
I didn’t say that, William James said that. He’s a pretty good reference. You seem to be under the impression that I either invented the term or discovered the movement. I have simply described its place in movement therapy for painful problems and proposed a method of amplifying its expression within a therapeutic context.

You can’t find any literature about ideomotor activity? Karen has offered some and Luke has compiled a ton. Doesn’t Spitz’s text count?

Try Googling "ideomotor" and see what happens.
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Old 28-05-2011, 01:35 PM   #20
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Hi Joe,
Karen pegged brain inhibition exactly right. The job of the cortex, overall, is to select, evaluate, and add meaning to raw sensory perception; only sensory perception that is deemed "salient", by the cortex, is ever given any "thought" by it - all the rest (way over 90%, according to researchers who study visual input, for example) is simply inhibited.

Here is a link to a recent piece about how maybe sometimes, normal inhibition fails. Brain scans reveal why some people feel your pain.

Barrett suggests, if the normal job of the cortex is to inhibit, then why not disinhibit it somewhere else, e.g., ask it to stop inhibiting movement, so it can (and will, naturally) get busy inhibiting what it should be inhibiting (i.e., "pain" output/nociceptive input/threat), instead.

To get the basics on what brains are, what comprises them, and how the parts work, I recommend Mayo Clinic Medical Neurosciences, 5th Ed. Great, great textbook, organized by systems conceptualized as horizontal and vertical (rather than as rostral, caudal, dorsal and ventral the way normal neuroscience texts are, which can be a bit confusing from a human perspective).
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Old 28-05-2011, 01:49 PM   #21
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I want to add that the text I recommended discusses the nervous system as an "inner tube" of internal regulation, from sacral parasympathetic ganglia to anterior cingulate cortex, and an "outer tube" of selectivity, awareness, and conscious input into the internal regulation system, to affect it, dampen its constant upwardly inputting activity.

Conscious motor output is one of the most accessible means the entire human organism has, of changing its own context. However, if it doesn't think it has the right to do this, it won't. Period.

Barrett is all about asking people to go in, find movement, then let it come out, whatever kind they have. When the cortex gets busy feeling its organism moving in novel ways, it pretty much takes up all its attention span, and shortly thereafter, feels delicious in all the appropriate ways. This exercises the afferent pathways (in that inner tube) in new or at least in unaccustomed ways, that the cortex approves of and that the person is likely to feel much better with. People being primates, however, usually need the idea to do this (or anything that should just come naturally) to come from outside ourselves, from someone in authority. So Barrett says, fine, I'll be your "therapist" who doesn't "do" anything to you, and instead I'll help you help yourself.
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Old 28-05-2011, 02:54 PM   #22
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People looking to "release" something may want to consider disinhibition, keeping in mind that it's also possible to disinhibit an inhibitory pathway.

I read a blog entry recently and was intrigued by the following quote

Quote:
The actions of others may be a stimulus, but not a cause, of our feelings
I thought about this as it relates to physical therapy and pain and what we discuss here on a routine basis.
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Old 28-05-2011, 03:54 PM   #23
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keeping in mind that it's also possible to disinhibit an inhibitory pathway.
What I meant to convey here is the idea of a currently inhibited inhibitory pathway (i.e. a pathway that inhibits something else when active) becoming active secondary to disinhibition from the neurons providing stimulus to it.
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Old 28-05-2011, 04:05 PM   #24
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I'm afraid I have to echo Joe's questions to Barrett.

I have a lot more reading to do I'm sure, and I plan on taking Barrett's course to gain some better insight. However, "softening" and "warming" have always been difficult for my mind to embrace. In my reading to this point, I have yet to see them operationally defined elsewhere in the literature.
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Old 28-05-2011, 04:20 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasOrtho View Post
I'm afraid I have to echo Joe's questions to Barrett.

I have a lot more reading to do I'm sure, and I plan on taking Barrett's course to gain some better insight. However, "softening" and "warming" have always been difficult for my mind to embrace. In my reading to this point, I have yet to see them operationally defined elsewhere in the literature.
TO, you'll gain a great deal more depth about that by listening to Will's latest interview with Roy Sugarman.
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Old 28-05-2011, 04:35 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasOrtho View Post
I'm afraid I have to echo Joe's questions to Barrett.

I have a lot more reading to do I'm sure, and I plan on taking Barrett's course to gain some better insight. However, "softening" and "warming" have always been difficult for my mind to embrace. In my reading to this point, I have yet to see them operationally defined elsewhere in the literature.
I don't think they have been operationally defined. To my knowledge they are explained as a change in the state of the autonomic nervous system and as felt senses of the patient. I think like the ideomotion itself - we see these things in the clinic with patients - we are looking for a scientific explanation for these things. In Maitland and McKenzie's books they describe felt senses of the patient and what they think those mean and how those are used in a clinical reasoning process. I've always seen Barrett's description of these felt senses as just like that. But there is actually a good deal of research on the autonomic nervous system and what it's influence is on felt sensation - so in that way Barrett''s characteristics of correction are more closely aligned with what we know than, for example, the centralization phenomenon.
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Old 28-05-2011, 04:49 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Newman View Post
What I meant to convey here is the idea of a currently inhibited inhibitory pathway (i.e. a pathway that inhibits something else when active) becoming active secondary to disinhibition from the neurons providing stimulus to it.
Disinhibition is an old thread I started back in RehabEdge days. The last link I provide in the thread is worth a re-read, or a first read for those who haven't given it a look before.
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Old 28-05-2011, 05:10 PM   #28
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I understand warming and softening to be the result of autonomic changes, but I sometimes wonder if they impede or at least delay the integration of ideomotion into the broader PT population.

You'd think with PTs eagerly embracing things like "unwinding" and "release", softening and warming wouldn't be too much of a conceptual reach. Not implying equivalence between unwinding and warming as constructs, just trying to figure out why my mind is more capable of pouncing on something like hypomobility yet winces at the notion of warming or softening.

Sounds like a personal issue, Rod. Probably is. But I wonder, based on similar questions from curious newcomers, how these concepts and constructs can be framed and integrated into mainstream practice. I suppose this would entail some combination of shaping the message and shaping the recipients' ability to retain and use it.

It's happened for me but taken quite a bit of time and work. I wonder if we can ever condition ourselves as a profession to have the patience it takes to truly learn.

I often ask students on rotation what they hope to learn/achieve on this rotation. My current student on 12-week rotation asks predictable questions about rehab protocols and the timing of adding specific exercises, etc... I asked him this week which he preferred - give him the answers or provide resources to discover the answers on his own. Knowing the intense desire of students to please their instructors, I told him there would be no judgment if he wanted my direct guidance.

I will admit that his answer was troubling nonetheless. He basically said with all the time he devotes to studying for the boards, he'd rather just be shown what to do. I appreciated his honesty but spent the rest of the day asking myself - what do I do with this?

I have a plan and hope it will work out. Jumping back on this forum, reading, and re-reading should help quite a bit.
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Old 28-05-2011, 09:30 PM   #29
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I've suggested before that plethmysmography and thermography are commonly used measurements in the health and biological sciences that could be used to at least quantitatively define as well as document softening and warming, respectively.

Since we know that the autonomic nervous system is responsible for mediating these effects, it makes clear sense to me that they would accompany corrective movement.

I suppose McCarthy and Rickards (aka, Luke) could've measured these in their study, but chose to use the currently popular "patient-centered" outcomes tools that we see in so much of the PT/manual therapy outcomes research these days.

Someone could just replicate their SSRD, get a grant for this perhaps expensive measurement equipment, and then have at it. Et voilà! evidence for (or against) softening and warming with ideomotion.

Rod, I nominate you.
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Old 28-05-2011, 10:51 PM   #30
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Yeah I'm all over it. Right now I'm too busy doing an observational case report on infantile ideomotoric behavior.

Based on what the NIH funds these days, I figure that's good for a $250K grant.
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Old 28-05-2011, 11:00 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasOrtho View Post

Based on what the NIH funds these days, I figure that's good for a $250K grant.
Only if you can connect it to alternative medicine through NCCAM, Rod...
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Old 28-05-2011, 11:33 PM   #32
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Hi Joe. I think the characteristics of correction are in the hypothesis realm at this point although they make sense from a plausibility standpoint. I agree that a study to see what, if any, patterns of sensation accompany a move toward relief is not only doable but would be most informative.

A while back I posted this about the background or theory of simple contact on another sight (I was in a scrum with a couple of chiropractors over PT and chiro manip turf. I know, shocking. But it came up when they attempted to say that my stance in relation to simple contact made my asserions in that argument un-credible):

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It simply states that people will seek an end state of comfort if not compelled to do otherwise (a documented phenomenon called the end state comfort effect), that the mechanism of action is ideomotor movement (again documented), that a non-threatening context is necessary for expression toward this end state (consistent with placebo research for example), and that manual contact is one method (but not the only way) of communicating this context. It is hypothesized that this method may be effective at relieving mechanical pain only. This is testable and has preliminary evidence warranting further study.
I know this doesn't relate to your specific questions about the "characteristics of correction" but I thought the end state comfort effect literature may be of some of value for you. Search that term and the author Rosenbaum. It is also referenced in the SSRD, references 10 and 11 I believe.
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Old 29-05-2011, 01:53 AM   #33
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I think this fits here, though it's rather long. Luke Rickards wrote it some time ago.

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Ideomotion can be described as instinctive, automatic expressions directly coupling dominant mental representations to action without intermediary volition (Carpenter, 1852; Spitz, 1997; Dorland, 2003). Ideomotor theory suggests that motor patterns can be automatically and intimately associated with their internal and external sensory effects, and will occur in the absence of any other cognitive representation or efferent motor command (Kunde et al., 2007). Although ideomotion has been commonly associated with non-volitional movements (Spitz, 1997), ideomotor theory also provides a compelling explanation for the generation of goal-oriented voluntary actions (Kunde et al., 2007; Keller et al., 2006). During ideomotor movements the sensory effects, such as the kinaesthetic and interoceptive sensations that may accompany each movement, are directly coupled with the generation of the movement itself (Knoblich & Prinz, 2005). Thus a kinaesthetic representation of a position that may be associated with reduced pain sensation, or stretch of a stiffened tissue, will be automatically coupled to the movement that produces the represented sensation. The pathway from sensory effect representation to movement may also involve feedback from the peripheral sensory apparatus at levels below attention, and this sensory input may facilitate the elaboration of motor patterns at higher levels (Cole, 2004). Alterations in motor output during the movement may be generated by continuing sensory effect representations and may be influenced by both conscious and non-conscious peripheral sensory feedback, thus resulting in the complex movement patterns seen during the intervention (Cole, 2004). Since varying interoceptive sensations may be perceived with even minute alterations in motor output in some instances movements may not be visible, though they will often still be palpable (Spitz, 1997).

Chronic spinal pain is commonly associated with reduced or altered movement (Leeuw et al., 2007). Most approaches to spinal pain management incorporate movement of some kind into the treatment strategy, however the factors underlying the observed benefits of movement are unclear and both physical and psychological mechanisms have been proposed (Moseley, 2003; Slade & Keating, 2007; Leeuw et al., 2007). Resistance exercises with the aim of strengthening deconditioned tissue or to address impairments in control and stability are commonly prescribed for chronic pain, however unloaded movement facilitation exercises produce comparable effects (Slade & Keating, 2007). There is accumulating evidence that pain-related fear is a significant factor in reduced or altered movement in chronic pain and challenging these fears in the context of movement is also associated with improved outcomes (Leeuw et al., 2007; Woods & Asmundson, 2007; Moseley, 2003). Evidence from movement exposure in vivo studies examining fear-avoidance behaviours in chronic low back pain have emphasized the importance of practicing a wide variety of movements both during treatment and as home exercise (Leeuw et al., 2007). Although the intervention used in this study may be described as a manual therapy, it is an entirely active approach and mimics several aspects of both unloaded movement facilitation exercises and movement exposure in vivo.
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Old 22-11-2011, 09:26 AM   #34
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Great video Karen and Barrett. Thanks

Idiomotion is something I have come across in various forms and contexts, as I am sure many have.

One form is in the MFR “unwinding”. This, in the class I attended anyway, often degenerated to some cathartic form of thrashing around that, while on one level may be perceived as healing, on another level I believe must be seen as threatening.

On many levels the body can not tell the difference between real and false danger which is why watching a horror movie will lead to a stress response in most of us. While at the end of a cathartic “unwind” the client is told they are safe, I find it difficult to accept that their nervous system perceives the event as safe during and immediately after this process.

Contrast this to the poetic dance that Mike is doing in this video. I find it hard to understand that anyone, having seen both versions, could chose for the catharsis I witnessed in my MFR class.

What a difference context makes.
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Old 22-11-2011, 10:53 AM   #35
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Yes, the "unwinding" spoken of and described endlessly by students of a certain practitioner is a specific mutation of expression.

I have concluded that it's a great money maker.
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Old 22-11-2011, 11:42 AM   #36
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Barret, are you aware of the application of ideomotion in stage magic/mentalism ? On of the "cleanest" versions is, although there are several tricks to make it easier and just appear as if, to let someone hide an object (not seen by you, no stooges), then take his hand and let him lead you to the object by constantly focussing on the place, but without saying a word (using someone cooperative, who doesn't try to work against you of course...the latter usually being men). An interesting exercise to pratice.
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Old 22-11-2011, 11:54 AM   #37
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I wrote years ago about Kreskin's use of this and he describes it in one of his books.

So yes, I am aware. Thanks for bringing it up.
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Old 30-05-2013, 10:42 AM   #38
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The operator uses osteopathy and Taoist technology
http://vk.com/video-43791081_1644860...b3b6a78e0b57e9

Simple Contact ?
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Old 30-05-2013, 02:08 PM   #39
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Dimitrii, Thank you for this.

I wouldn't disagree with this manner of care though I would probably improve the context a bit. Well, my version of improvement anyway. I appreciate there being no randomly used copying machine next to the patient's head; something I've endured in the past.

An explanation of Taoist Technology contains a number of terms and concepts I've endorsed in other writing as well.

The tendency for unconsciously generated thought (read instinctive and Wall's resolution) to become visibly active motion in response to permission that is verbal, non-verbal and tactile is what I guess you'd call my "method" but it seems necessary to read writers like Eagleman to explain it rationally.

I must say, if you use a term like Taoist Technology you're going to immediately face the derision of many people. In Ohio anyway. I personally have no problem with it but that's because of the culture my mother created for me in my youth.

I find it of some interest that Andrew Taylor Still articulated The Law of the Artery in the 1800s. I think there's something to it as far as pain with an origin of mechanical deformation goes.

Again, thank you for this.
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Old 30-05-2013, 04:39 PM   #40
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I also found this, written long ago, connecting my method to Taoist philosophy, according to the link above.

And to think, I went to The Ohio State University.
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Old 30-05-2013, 09:47 PM   #41
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Interesting video. The "patient's" movements appear almost spasmodic at times. I haven't experienced this with any patients whom I've been able to elicit what I would have to call ideomotion.

I wonder what role the variability in cultural "rules" about movement might play in how ideomotion may be expressed. We might need to consult an anthropologist.

I wish we could see the position of her feet.

Dmitri, are you able to translate any of the comments from the Toaist osteopath?
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Old 31-05-2013, 01:06 AM   #42
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I wish there were a thank you multiplier on this forum. That is one of my favorite essays Barrett.
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Old 31-05-2013, 01:36 AM   #43
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You're welcome Rod.

I've always liked that one too.
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Old 31-05-2013, 02:02 AM   #44
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Barrett-

After reading your Samurai Therapist essay I immediately thought of this scene from the movie Forgetting Sarah Marshall

[YT]PKIpCPS-oZc[/YT]
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Old 31-05-2013, 02:13 AM   #45
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That's really funny Brent. I posted the exact same video several months ago in reference to my experience translating Barrett's lesson's.

Truly, the film is transcendent.
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Old 31-05-2013, 07:55 PM   #46
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Rod,
Glad to hear I wasn't the only one who thought of that movie. Paul Rudd is one of my favorite comedic actors.
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Old 04-06-2013, 08:16 PM   #47
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Spontaneous ideomotor movement??
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=vNJ1kiEcNxs
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Old 04-06-2013, 09:54 PM   #48
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It seems you're reaching into a realm I don't visit.
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Old 05-06-2013, 04:46 PM   #49
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Quote:
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Interesting video. The "patient's" movements appear almost spasmodic at times. I haven't experienced this with any patients whom I've been able to elicit what I would have to call ideomotion...
Very high-amplitude spastic movements are observed after the course somatic emotional release and holotropic breathing
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Old 05-06-2013, 04:50 PM   #50
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...and setting your patient on fire.
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