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Old 09-02-2010, 11:58 AM   #1
Barrett Dorko
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In this thread in post #38 I said:

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Perhaps when we succeed with patients we are simply revealing what was already there. For that to happen efficiently we have to know what pain relief “looks” like and we have to as best we can avoid the creation of illusion - by that I mean the illusions we as therapists tend to see.
The manual magician doesn't make something out of nothing. He or she removes a cover most observers don’t realize is there. Then all we really have to do is make the patient aware of their own covers.

Sometimes I do a sleight with a card that makes this point for the patient. It took some time and dedicated practice to learn well, but now all I need to do is remember the card in my pocket and find the right time to reveal it.

That last one has taken years.
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Old 03-03-2011, 10:39 AM   #2
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I thought this post deserved a revisit. The link to Notes from the Holocene is also worth rereading.

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No takers? Okay, let's try this:

It occurs to me that I’ve yet to define Holocene for you. From Sagan himself:

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Holocene is an adjective meaning “of or belonging to the geologic time, rock series or sedimentary deposits of the more recent of the two epochs of the Quaternary Period, beginning at the end of the last Ice Age about 11,000 years ago and characterized by the development of human civilizations.”
(I have the feeling that Nari may have already known this)

Just above this definition Sagan writes: “The world is a strange and beautiful place. And magical. The same reality admits of multiple perspectives. We can see it from the front of the stage like spectators at a magic show. Or from the back, like scientists figuring it out. (And though) as Oscar Wilde said, ‘Illusion is the first of all pleasures,’ science is about finding the truth whether we like it or not.”

In these few words Sagan sums up the attitude common to those of us who cling steadily to Soma Simple. We appreciate the allure of magic and illusion, but we understand our responsibilities as therapists.

“The whittling down of something wondrous to something mechanical can be disappointing,” says Sagan, and I agree. But ironically, the opposite is also true, and I would restate it this way:

Revealing the deep neurologic model truly responsible for the effect of manual care has been, for a few, wonderfully exciting.
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Old 03-03-2011, 11:51 AM   #3
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Karen,

Thanks for bringing this up. The method of revealing the card is something I still practice. The trick of loading the hand, revealing the card, making it "disappear" again and matching my words to their reaction remains somethig that requires careful attention.

I consider this something that has taken me years to learn to do well.

But then, I didn't have a teacher - or this forum.
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Old 03-03-2011, 03:24 PM   #4
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On Tues I treated a 41 year old women who has suffered from persistent L sided otalgia and occipital cephalgia. I have seen this pt. several times over the last several months and although she has noted modest benefit the problem persisted. She has tried several medications and has received multiple trigger point injections and nerve blocks. Nothing has really helped.
On Tues. a wonderful thing happened. The soft tissue resistance fully softened and I could easily feel movement between the occiput and upper cervicals. She got up from the table and appeared to have awakened from a years of sleeping. I’m not kidding. She reported the absence of light headedness and ear pain present for months. I did absolutely nothing different but this time a fundamental change occurred.
If this turns out to be magical, it will not be because of manual skill. After all I have approached the session each time in precisely the same manner. If it happened it will be because of patience, practice, attention and something present in the patient. Too bad we don’t get to control that part.
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Old 03-03-2011, 10:46 PM   #5
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A great post Gil.

You understand the power of persistent attempts to create a context that, eventually, the patient's brain decides is enough. When you've done enough is anyone's guess, but committing to stick it out is a decision the therapist, and only the therapist can make.

I've often felt that the best part of being a therapist was the opportunity to be present when change occurs.
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Old 04-03-2011, 02:39 AM   #6
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Barrett,

Maybe we're not dead.


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Old 04-03-2011, 09:09 PM   #7
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Gil,
I loved your post.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gil Haight View Post
I did absolutely nothing different but this time a fundamental change occurred.
Gil
You did nothing different but You did something. This something, even released very simple, piqued my curiosity.May I therefore ask You to tell us what you did. Only simple contact? Did You only have put Your hands in shoulder or in another part of the body of the patient?
I am not sure if I have the right to ask this but the question is already done.
North Portugal
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Old 04-03-2011, 10:35 PM   #8
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Barrett
[QUOTE=Barrett Dorko;101894]
You understand the power of persistent attempts to create a context that, eventually, the patient's brain decides is enough.[/Quote
Until now, creating a nonthreatening context was seen, in my simplistic viewpoint, as a isolated act in a session. But I agree that it is wiser to consider it as a continuum over several sessions if necessary.
I recognize that more than adding something to the dialogue, I am only thinking loud. Let's say that it is my way of having myself some insight about.
Thanks, Barrett.
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Old 05-03-2011, 01:06 AM   #9
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Benjamin,

Thank You for the question.

You're right, I of course did something. My point was that what I accomplished was tried several times previously and was met with resistance that for unknown reasons was absent this time. If you have followed this blog for awhile I'm sure you are aware of the skepticism associated with technique. This of course means there is a way to proceed consistent across therapists. Since I don't think that is possible I seldom speak in terms of technique.

So here is an attempt to describe what I think happened. If one introduces a slight amount of traction or compression from anywhere on the body the patient will unconsciously either allow or resist the movement. In order for the therapist to appreciate the patients response the amount of initial force must be slight. If the patient resists the momentum of the therapists action it is because they prefer to move in a different direction. It is not difficult, but clearly unusual, to recognize the resistance as potential movement. I don't think it is unusual at all to discuss a form of "therapy" in terms of how patients remain sick because of impeding the natural urge to self correct. With this therapy the urge involves movement and it is commonly "covered up" for many reasons. In this particular case I introduced an action at the suboccipital region which I presume eventually led to a distinct movement between C1 and the occiput.

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